Zuza

Zuza is a 22m sailing vessel with interesting and unusual credentials. She was designed and built in 1998 in Cape Town, South Africa by Eraco, a company specialising in building aluminium craft for the defence and commercial industries.

Zuza under sail

Zuza was built to sail anywhere round the globe, being self sufficient for long periods at sea, and has worked in some exotic locations coping admirably with a variety of extreme weather conditions. Following completion the British Royal Geographical Society selected Zuza as an offshore base for an international marine research project off the east coast of Africa where her facilities and reliability helped to facilitate ground-breaking research.

Zuza is a purpose-built liveaboard, not a conversion. She currently accommodates eight guests and up to four crew in comfort. Unusually, for a vessel of this size, she has two lovely double-bedded cabins which we know are popular with our guests. There are another two twin berth cabins and the two shower rooms with WCs are close to all cabins. Zuza has a comfortable saloon adjacent to a well equipped galley and lots of windows throughout to make the most of long summer evenings. There are two separate crew cabins.

On deck there is a new large, enclosed wheelhouse, with enough seating for guests plus crew. The sail area and configuration of Zuza is identical to the Global (BT) Challenge 72 yachts which were specifically designed to be easily handled by a crew of just two.

Like Hjalmar Bjørge, Zuza has twin engines so we can motor during cruises as and when we please. However we also intend to spend time, daily if conditions permit, sailing Zuza using the power of the wind. Clean cruising. Green cruising. Sailing is a very environmentally friendly and low impact means of exploring the seas.

When Zuza sailed the Hebridean seas with Northern Light Charters in 2008 it wasn’t for the first time. She had previously sailed a couple of “Full Circle Britain” expeditions with the Scottish leg starting in Oban and ending in Orkney.

DID YOU KNOW?

Atlantic puffins have penguin-like colouring but they sport a colourful beak that has led some to dub them the "sea parrot". The beak fades to a drab grey during the winter and blooms with colour again in the spring.